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Potatoes

SCIENTIFIC NAME

S. tuberosum

CLASSIFICATION

Vegetable

SEASON

January, February, March, April, May, June, July, August, September, October, November, December

About

Potatoes are the world’s fourth largest food crop, behind rice, wheat and maize, and while discovered in Peru are now used in many cultures across the globe. From Italian gnocchi, Indian Curries to the much loved potato salad at a summer BBQ, the versatility of potatoes knows no bounds.

Potatoes are grown and supplied in WA throughout the year from Dandaragan up north to Manjimup in the South West. There are two main things to look for in potatoes that will change the flavour and the type of cooking they are best for. The first one is internal flesh colour, most potato varieties flesh colour ranges from white to yellow on the inside (although there are some varieties like purple congo that are purple on the inside and outside!) The second is external skin colour which can be white, yellow, red and blue, or a combination! There are a large range of potatoes that are available now and it is best to check with your local Green Grocer which varieties are better for roasting, mashing, chips, frying or salads. We recommend using red skin for mashing, blue skin for roasting, yellow skin for chips and frying and white skin for salads.

Choose potatoes that are firm and have no sprouts or greening.

Store potatoes in a cool, dry place away from light – a kitchen cupboard is ideal. Too much moisture causes rotting. Don’t refrigerate them, or the starch will convert to sugar.

Mature potatoes keep for weeks; new potatoes only a week.

The uses of potatoes are endless! A lot of the new varieties have thin skin, so try leaving the skin on next time you’re making a potato mash. Potatoes make great chips, salads, soups, gnocchi, roasts and can be baked whole and served with many different types of toppings.

The uses of potatoes are endless! A lot of the new varieties have thin skin, so try leaving the skin on next time you’re making a potato mash. Potatoes make great chips, salads, soups, gnocchi, roasts and can be baked whole and served with many different types of toppings.

Potatoes are naturally fat, sodium and cholesterol free, making them downright undeniable for any diet and are high in Vitamin C and Vitamin B6.

POTATOES PALE SKIN
Nutrient Value per 100 g
Proximates
Energy, including dietary fibre 280 kJ
Moisture 81.3 g
Protein 2.3 g
Nitrogen 0.37 g
Fat 0.1 g
Ash 0.9 g
Dietary fibre 1.6 g
Fructose 0.1 g
Glucose 0.3 g
Sucrose 0.2 g
Total sugars 0.6 g
Starch 12.3 g
Available carbohydrate, without sugar alcohols 12.9 g
Available carbohydrate, with sugar alcohols 12.9 g
Organic Acids
Malic acid 0.1 g
Citric acid 0.4 g
Minerals
Calcium (Ca) 4 mg
Copper (Cu) 0.038 mg
Fluoride (F) 0 mg
Iodine (I) 0 ug
Iron (Fe) 0.55 mg
Magnesium (Mg) 19 mg
Manganese (Mn) 0.126 mg
Phosphorus (P) 57 mg
Potassium (K) 459 mg
Selenium 0 ug
Sodium (Na) 4 mg
Zinc (Zn) 0.32 mg
Vitamins
Thiamin (B1) 0.084 mg
Riboflavin (B2) 0.026 mg
Niacin (B3) 1.26 mg
Niacin Equivalents 1.73 mg
Pantothenic acid (B5) 0.21 mg
Pyridoxine (B6) 0.12 mg
Folate, natural 11 ug
Total folates 11 ug
Dietry folate equivalents 11 ug
Alpha carotene 0 ug
Beta carotene 0 ug
Beta carotene equivalents 0 ug
Retinol equivalents 0 ug
Vitamin C 21 mg

Source:

NUTTAB 2010(Food Standards Australia New Zealand); FOOD STANDARDS & SAFETY – PROJECT MANAGEMENT – Data Collection – 2000 Analytical Program – Vitamin D & Iodine – Pt 9 – ANZFASC.
Fox, M., Rayner, C. and Wu, P. (1988) Amino acid composition of Australian foods. Food Technology in Australia 40:320-323.
Greenfield, H., Wimalasiri, P., Han, L.T.N., Balmer, N. and Wills, R.B.H. (1981) Composition of Australian foods. 6. Chinese foods. Food Technology in Australia 33:176-181.
Wills, R.B.H., Lim, J.S.K. and Greenfield, H. (1984) Variation in nutrient composition of Australian retail potatoes over a 12-month period. Journal of the Science of Food and Agriculture 35:1012-1017.