SCIENTIFIC NAME

Musa balbisiana;
Musa acuminate

CLASSIFICATION

Fruit

SEASON

January, February, April, June, July, August, September, October, November, December

About

The peach is a luscious Summer time fruit. It is distinguished by its round shape, distinctive vertical indention, suede like skin and sweet juicy flesh. Rich in taste, it is also rich in nutrients that combine to provide digestive and circulatory benefits. Delicious on its own, it also stars in drinks, baking, on top of cakes or in salads, both sweet and savoury.

The peach has an aromatic, sweet and tangy, juicy, soft melting flesh.

Two major types are available based on flesh colour – yellow and white. The white flesh peach is very sweet and the yellow flesh has a more tangy flavour due to its higher sugar acid ratio.

Local peaches are available from October through to May.

In Western Australia the growing regions are the Coral Coast, South West and Perth & Surrounds.

Recently our quarantine protocols have changed, allowing USA peaches into WA, which means we can also enjoy this beautiful fruit in the middle of winter (which is the summer harvest season in the USA).

Seasons Chart

Seasonal supply to the WA market.
Sources: PMA,ABS, DAFWA

Tips and Hints

Do not store peaches in the fridge.

When choosing bananas go for plump, firm and brightly coloured fruit with no large brown spots (brown spots indicates bruising). Occasional brown spots on the skin are normal, but sunken, moist-looking dark areas will likely show up as bruises on the fruit.

Bananas should have their stem ends and skin intact. A split skin or stem may become an entry point for contamination.

It is also fine to buy slightly green bananas if you they do not require eating immediately. These can be stored at room temperature and should ripen within 5 days.

To speed up ripening place in a brown paper bag and leave at room temperature, away from heat or direct sun. Putting an apple in the bag will speed up the process.

Once ripened, bananas can be kept at room temperature for a day or two. Then, the fruit can be stored in a refrigerator to slow down ripening. The skin will turn dark, but the fruit will remain perfectly edible. Refrigerated bananas can be stored up to two weeks.

Banana flesh can also be frozen but again they need to be ripe first. To store, peel skin and wrap flesh in cling film for freezing.

Importantly, bananas should never be refrigerated or frozen before ripening as this will interrupt the ripening process.

Tips and Hints.

To speed up ripening place in a brown paper bag.

Do not store in fridge or freezer until ripe.

To freeze, remove skin and wrap flesh in cling film.

To peel, think like a monkey and peel from the end of the fruit rather than the stem. Trying to peel a banana from the stem can be difficult and result in bruising. Rather, pinch the tip with your thumb and index finger and the skin will easily split resulting in an effortless peel.
Once cut the fruit will turn brown. To prevent this, dip in lemon, lime, orange or pineapple juice.

You can save overripe bananas by peeling them, wrapping them in cling film and freezing them. Frozen bananas are perfect as a cool treat or blended in smoothies. Or, alternatively thaw them and use for baking, like Banana Bread where peak sweetness and “mushiness” are desirable.

Bananas bruise easily, so handle them with care.

Tips and Hints

To prevent discolouring dip in lemon, lime, orange or pineapple juice.

Freeze over ripe fruit and use when ready in smoothies or baking.

Click here for Banana and Lime Jam recipe

To peel, think like a monkey and peel from the end of the fruit rather than the stem. Trying to peel a banana from the stem can be difficult and result in bruising. Rather, pinch the tip with your thumb and index finger and the skin will easily split resulting in an effortless peel.
Once cut the fruit will turn brown. To prevent this, dip in lemon, lime, orange or pineapple juice.

You can save overripe bananas by peeling them, wrapping them in cling film and freezing them. Frozen bananas are perfect as a cool treat or blended in smoothies. Or, alternatively thaw them and use for baking, like Banana Bread where peak sweetness and “mushiness” are desirable.

Bananas bruise easily, so handle them with care.

Tips and Hints

To prevent discolouring dip in lemon, lime, orange or pineapple juice.

Freeze over ripe fruit and use when ready in smoothies or baking.

Click here for Banana and Lime Jam recipe

Peaches are low in calories, high in fibre, rich in vitamin C, A, antioxidants, potassium and other important trace elements. This unique combinations means the peach offers anti inflammatory, cancer fighting and circulation benefits to the body.

PEACH
Nutrient Value per 100 g
Proximates
Energy, including dietary fibre 195 kJ
Moisture 85.7 g
Protein 1 g
Nitrogen 0.16 g
Fat 0.1 g
Ash 0.5 g
Dietary fibre 2.3 g
Fructose 1.5 g
Glucose 1.3 g
Sucrose 5.7 g
Total sugars 8.5 g
Starch 0.1 g
Sorbitol 0.3 g
Available carbohydrate, without sugar alcohols 8.7 g
Available carbohydrate, with sugar alcohols 9 g
Organic Acids
Malic acid 0.4 g
Citric acid 0.4 g
Quinic acid 0.3 g
Minerals
Arsenic (As) 0.8 ug
Cadmium (Cd) 0.1 ug
Calcium (Ca) 7 mg
Copper (Cu) 0.067 mg
Iodine (I) 1.8 ug
Iron (Fe) 0.3 mg
Magnesium (Mg) 9 mg
Manganese (Mn) 0.041 mg
Molybdenum (Mo) 1.1 ug
Nickel (Ni) 8 ug
Phosphorus (P) 21 mg
Potassium (K) 241 mg
Sodium (Na) 2 mg
Tin (Sn) 0.6 ug
Zinc (Zn) 0.12 mg
Vitamins
Thiamin (B1) 0.006 mg
Riboflavin (B2) 0.023 mg
Niacin (B3) 1.01 mg
Niacin Equivalents 1.21 mg
Pantothenic acid (B5) 0.17 mg
Pyridoxine (B6) 0.02 mg
Folate, natural 0 ug
Total folates 0 ug
Dietary folate equivalents 0 ug
Alpha carotene 2 ug
Beta carotene 147 ug
Cryptoxanthin 0 ug
Beta carotene equivalents 148 ug
Retinol equivalents 25 ug
Vitamin C 9 mg
Alpha tocopherol 0.7 mg
Vitamin E 0.7 mg
Amino Acids
Tryptophan (mg/g N) 74 MN
Tryptophan (mg) 12 mg

Source:

NUTTAB 2010(Food Standards Australia New Zealand); The University of New South Wales; Professor Heather Greenfield and co-workers at the University of New South Wales; Tables of composition of Australian Aboriginal Foods (J Brand-Miller, KW James and PMA Maggiore).