SCIENTIFIC NAME

Citrus × sinensis

CLASSIFICATION

Fruit

SEASON

January, July, August, September, October, November, December

About

The orange, with its bright coloured dimpled skin and sweet, juicy, pulpy flesh is one of the world’s most popular fruits. Rich in antioxidants, most famously Vitamin C, the orange is also the richest fruit source of hesperetin, which protects the body cells as we age. Not just a sporting snack, the orange is a fruit that can be featured in the most sophisticated of meals and is perfect in baking and drinks.

The orange has a strong, zesty bouquet and sweet (sometimes tart) juicy, pulpy flesh.

West Australian oranges have two seasons. The Navel orange is available from April to November and in abundant supply from June to October.

The Valencia orange (best for juicing) is available from October through to April and in abundant supply from December to February.

Seaonal supply to the WA market

For a sweet, less acidic taste, replace lemon juice with orange juice in salad dressings.

When choosing oranges look for bright, coloured skin and feel for firm, heavy in size fruit.

Always avoid oranges that are bruised, wrinkled or discoloured as this indicates that the fruit is old or has been stored incorrectly. It is however, important to remember that skin colour is not necessarily a good guide to the quality of the fruit. In summer, Valencia oranges can still be ripe if they are partly green. This is because the green colour acts as a natural sunscreen but it does not affect the juicy and sweet flavour. However, avoid inconsistent skin colour in the winter and on the Navel orange. Choose only brightly coloured orange fruit.

Citrus fruit peel can also vary in thickness and is dependent on the weather conditions during the growing season. As a general guide, fruit with thin skins tend to be juicer than fruit with thick skins.

Oranges can be stored at room temperature, in the refrigerator without plastic bags or in the crisper drawer for up to two weeks. (They do not ripen further after harvest)

Tips and Hints
Whole oranges do not freeze well but the juice does.

To peel an orange, firstly roll the fruit, with a small amount of pressure, on a hard surface to loosen skin. From here there are two methods to peel an orange, either by hand or by knife and dessert or teaspoon.

To peel by hand pierce skin with thumbnail about 1.5cm below the stem mark. From here use your thumb to lift skin from fruit flesh.

The second method uses the same technique but replaces the thumb with the knife and spoon. Firstly cut the fruit with the knife just below the stem mark. Make sure the cut is wide enough to accommodate the tip of the spoon. Slide the spoon tip (face down) between the skin and flesh to lift skin. From here work around the orange to remove all skin.

To segment an orange for salads, desserts and presentation:

1. Slice a little off the top and bottom to provide a stable cutting surface, then trim the skin and pith with a paring knife.

2. Look for segment outline on fruit and slip the knife between one of the segments and the connective membrane. Cut slowly until you reach the middle of the orange, being careful not to cut through any of the membrane.

3. Use a scooping motion turn the knife back on itself, hook under the bottom edge of the citrus segment, and pry it away. The side that is still attached to a membrane will peel away, leaving you with a perfect wedge.

4. Continue on with the next segment until complete.

To juice and orange:
Cut through the widest (middle) of the orange to allow for ease of use with hand juicer.

Tips and Hints
To peel, firstly roll the fruit, with a small amount of pressure, on a hard surface to loosen skin.

To peel an orange, firstly roll the fruit, with a small amount of pressure, on a hard surface to loosen skin. From here there are two methods to peel an orange, either by hand or by knife and dessert or teaspoon.

To peel by hand pierce skin with thumbnail about 1.5cm below the stem mark. From here use your thumb to lift skin from fruit flesh.

The second method uses the same technique but replaces the thumb with the knife and spoon. Firstly cut the fruit with the knife just below the stem mark. Make sure the cut is wide enough to accommodate the tip of the spoon. Slide the spoon tip (face down) between the skin and flesh to lift skin. From here work around the orange to remove all skin.

To segment an orange for salads, desserts and presentation:

1. Slice a little off the top and bottom to provide a stable cutting surface, then trim the skin and pith with a paring knife.

2. Look for segment outline on fruit and slip the knife between one of the segments and the connective membrane. Cut slowly until you reach the middle of the orange, being careful not to cut through any of the membrane.

3. Use a scooping motion turn the knife back on itself, hook under the bottom edge of the citrus segment, and pry it away. The side that is still attached to a membrane will peel away, leaving you with a perfect wedge.

4. Continue on with the next segment until complete.

To juice and orange:
Cut through the widest (middle) of the orange to allow for ease of use with hand juicer.

Tips and Hints
To peel, firstly roll the fruit, with a small amount of pressure, on a hard surface to loosen skin.

Oranges are extremely beneficial for the body. Widely known for their high Vitamin C content they are and also an excellent source of dietry fibre, a good source of Thiamin, Folate and Potassium and very low in Saturated Fat, Cholesterol and Sodium.

NAVEL ORANGE
Nutrient Value per 100 g
Proximates
Energy, including dietary fibre 175 kJ
Moisture 86.7 g
Protein 1 g
Nitrogen 0.16 g
Fat 0.1 g
Ash 0.5 g
Dietary fibre 2.4 g
Fructose 1.9 g
Glucose 1.8 g
Sucrose 4.3 g
Total sugars 8 g
Available carbohydrate, without sugar alcohols 8 g
Available carbohydrate, with sugar alcohols 8 g
Organic Acids
Malic acid 0.1 g
Citric acid 0.6 g
Minerals
Calcium (Ca) 25 mg
Copper (Cu) 0.06 mg
Iron (Fe) 0.37 mg
Magnesium (Mg) 11 mg
Manganese (Mn) 0 mg
Phosphorus (P) 20 mg
Potassium (K) 147 mg
Sodium (Na) 3 mg
Zinc (Zn) 0.15 mg
Vitamins
Thiamin (B1) 0.083 mg
Riboflavin (B2) 0.038 mg
Niacin (B3) 0.2 mg
Niacin Equivalents 0.49 mg
Pantothenic Acid (B5) 0 mg
Pyridoxine (B6) 0.03 mg
Biotin (B7) 0 ug
Folate, natural 43 ug
Total folates 43 ug
Dietary folate equivalents 43 ug
Alpha carotene 19 ug
Beta carotene 72 ug
Beta carotene equivalents 82 ug
Xanthophyl 1166.6 ug
Retinol equivalents 14 ug
Vitamin C 53 mg
Alpha tocopherol 0.2 mg
Vitamin E 0.22 mg
Amino Acids
Tryptophan (mg/g N) 108 MN
Tryptophan (mg) 17 mg

Source:

NUTTAB 2010(Food Standards Australia New Zealand); The University of New South Wales; Professor Heather Greenfield and co-workers at the University of New South Wales; Tables of composition of Australian Aboriginal Foods (J Brand-Miller, KW James and PMA Maggiore).

Tips and Hints:

One orange provides the recommended daily intake of Vitamin C.