SCIENTIFIC NAME

Mangifera indica

CLASSIFICATION

Fruit

SEASON

January, February, March, April, September, October, November

About

Nothing signifies the Australian Summer like the Mango. The second most grown fruit crop in the world (second to the banana), this luscious, fleshy, juicy, decadent fruit is a taste sensation with the added bonus of being nutritious. Considered the “King of Fruit” and the “Food of the Gods” the mango can be simply eaten fresh or featured in salads, drinks, desserts or pickles.

Sublime, the mango with its fleshy fibrous texture, tastes like it smells – sweet and peachy with a slight refreshing sour undertone.

It is available from August through to April and is in abundant supply from September to November and January through to April.

Tips and Hints
Although considered a Summer time fruit the Mango is in limited supply in December.

Look for fruit with a shiny golden skin, free of skin bruising. Feel also for a slight softness, use very gentle pressure on the skin and if it yields it is ready to eat. Also smell for mango aroma as a strong smelling aroma indicates fruit is ripe and ready to eat.
When purchasing unripe mangoes, look for green coloured skin and hard flesh. Once home do not store in refrigerater rather store them out of direct sunlight at room temperature for a few days until they ripen. To speed process, store in a brown paper bag.

Once ripe, they can then be stored in the refrigerator for 2 to 3 days before use. Ensure the mangoes can breathe so, if bagged, ensure they are in paper bags not plastic. Alternatively store loose in fruit and vegetable compartment in refrigerator.

Mangoes also freeze really well. They can be sliced and bagged, or pureed and placed into ice cube trays ready to use.

Tips and Hints
Store in brown paper bag at room temperature to speed ripening process.

To enjoy maximum sweetness, allow the fruit to warm to room temperature.

To eat a ripe mango elegantly (without getting the juice all over you) and/or to prepare fruit for salads or freezing, slice off the cheeks on either side of the fruit, running the knife against the flat side of the seed from the stem attachment to the tip of the fruit. Turn over the cheek and cut the flesh into bight size pieces in a square pattern in both directions. The cheek can then be turned inside out by holding the ends of the fruit and pushing the skin in the centre of the cheek upwards with your thumb. The flesh opens out into cubed shaped portions for eating fresh fruit or making juice or smoothies.

Unripe mango can also be are used in pickles, chutneys, salads or consumed fresh. The flesh is denser and harder and can be grated or cubed. However before slicing the mango cheeks you will need to peel skin first.

Tips and Hints
Once cheeks are removed the seed and remaining flesh can be frozen ready as an ice treat, great for teething infants.

To enjoy maximum sweetness, allow the fruit to warm to room temperature.

To eat a ripe mango elegantly (without getting the juice all over you) and/or to prepare fruit for salads or freezing, slice off the cheeks on either side of the fruit, running the knife against the flat side of the seed from the stem attachment to the tip of the fruit. Turn over the cheek and cut the flesh into bight size pieces in a square pattern in both directions. The cheek can then be turned inside out by holding the ends of the fruit and pushing the skin in the centre of the cheek upwards with your thumb. The flesh opens out into cubed shaped portions for eating fresh fruit or making juice or smoothies.

Unripe mango can also be are used in pickles, chutneys, salads or consumed fresh. The flesh is denser and harder and can be grated or cubed. However before slicing the mango cheeks you will need to peel skin first.

Tips and Hints
Once cheeks are removed the seed and remaining flesh can be frozen ready as an ice treat, great for teething infants.

The mango is not only delicious but extremely good for you. It is low in fat and high in energy, fibre, Vitamin C and a great source of minerals and vitamins essential for good health.

A 200g serve of ripe mango (the equivalent of less than one mango) provides you with up to three times your recommended daily intake of Vitamin A and Vitamin C.

Vitamin C, an antioxidant important in protecting the body from infection, is required in the formation of collagen, a protein that gives structure to bones, cartilage, muscle and blood vessels.

Nutritional Chart

MANGO
Nutrient Value per 100 g
Proximates
Energy, including dietary fibre 230 kJ
Moisture 84.1 g
Protein 0.9 g
Nitrogen 0.15 g
Fat 0.2 g
Ash 0.4 g
Dietary fibre 1.5 g
Fructose 2.7 g
Glucose 0.8 g
Sucrose 7.7 g
Total sugars 11.2 g
Starch 0.5 g
Available carbohydrate, without sugar alcohols 11.6 g
Available carbohydrate, with sugar alcohols 11.6 g
Organic Acids
Malic acid 0.2 g
Citric acid 0.7 g
Minerals
Calcium (Ca) 7 mg
Chromium (Cr) 0.2 ug
Copper (Cu) 0.12 mg
Iron (Fe) 0.3 mg
Magnesium (Mg) 8 mg
Manganese (Mn) 0.2 mg
Nickel (Ni) 2 ug
Phosphorus (P) 14 mg
Potassium (K) 197 mg
Sodium (Na) 1 mg
Zinc (Zn) 0.18 mg
Vitamins
Thiamin (B1) 0.018 mg
Riboflavin (B2) 0.037 mg
Niacin (B3) 0.56 mg
Niacin Equivalents 0.84 mg
Pantothenic acid (B5) 0.11 mg
Alpha carotene 9 ug
Beta carotene 1433 ug
Cryptoxanthin 1516 ug
Beta carotene equivalents 2195 ug
Retinol equivalents 366 ug
Vitamin C 26 mg
Alpha tocopherol 1.3 mg
Vitamin E 1.3 mg
Amino Acids
Tryptophan (mg/g N) 116 MN
Tryptophan (mg) 17 mg

Source:

NUTTAB 2010(Food Standards Australia New Zealand); The University of New South Wales; Professor Heather Greenfield and co-workers at the University of New South Wales; Tables of composition of Australian Aboriginal Foods (J Brand-Miller, KW James and PMA Maggiore).

Tips and Hints:
Blend frozen mango with yoghurt, milk and banana for a filling, healthy start to your day.