SCIENTIFIC NAME

Vitis vinifera

CLASSIFICATION

Fruit

SEASON

January, February, March, April, May, November, December

About

Long considered a symbol of good luck, togetherness and pleasure, the table grape, exploding in the mouth with its sweet, juicy, refreshing taste, is also considered a heart disease and cancer protector. Available in many varieties and colours, most commonly red and green, this mostly Summer-time fruit is ready to eat as is, or in dishes both savoury and sweet.

Very sweet, juicy, aromatic and sometimes tart, grapes burst into the mouth and refresh the palate.

Grapes are available from local growers from November through to July, with peaks in December through to April.

Recently our quarantine protocols have changed, allowing USA grapes into WA, which means we can also enjoy this beautiful fruit in the middle of winter (which is the summer harvest season in the USA).

When choosing green grapes, look for uniform size, firm and plump berries. (Wrinkled skin indicates old grapes). The bunches should be securely attached to their stems but not be too tight, with stems being green in colour (not brown).

When buying red or black varieties, look for a silvery coating (which is a natural bloom that protects the fruit’s freshness).

To keep grapes fresh store them in an airtight container in the coolest part of your refrigerator. In these conditions, you can expect a storage time of at least one week.

For longer storage, grapes can be canned, frozen, or made into juice or sweet spreads to enhance meals throughout the year.

Grapes can also be dried as raisins for use as a snack or in baking.

Tips and Hints
The silvery coating on red or black grapes protects the fruit’s freshness.

Wash with water just before use, drain and pat dry.

For seeded grapes, remove seeds by cutting grapes into halves lengthwise and scooping out seeds with the point of a knife.

When preparing small clusters of grapes for garnishing, cut the clusters with scissors. This helps keep the grapes attached to the stem.

Serve slightly chilled to enhance their crisp texture and refreshing flavor.

To remove the skin of grapes, freeze grapes first, then rinse in lukewarm water until skins split. Skins will then slip right off.

Grapes can also be dried as raisins for use as a snack or in baking. To dry, scatter on top on baking paper on a tray and bake at the lowest oven temperature for approximately 2 – 3 hours. Check every 30 minutes. Cool and if not using immediately, store in glass container.

Tips and Hints
Grapes are easier to peel when frozen.

Wash with water just before use, drain and pat dry.

For seeded grapes, remove seeds by cutting grapes into halves lengthwise and scooping out seeds with the point of a knife.

When preparing small clusters of grapes for garnishing, cut the clusters with scissors. This helps keep the grapes attached to the stem.

Serve slightly chilled to enhance their crisp texture and refreshing flavor.

To remove the skin of grapes, freeze grapes first, then rinse in lukewarm water until skins split. Skins will then slip right off.

Grapes can also be dried as raisins for use as a snack or in baking. To dry, scatter on top on baking paper on a tray and bake at the lowest oven temperature for approximately 2 – 3 hours. Check every 30 minutes. Cool and if not using immediately, store in glass container.

Tips and Hints
Grapes are easier to peel when frozen.

Fresh grapes are very low in Saturated Fat, Cholesterol and Sodium. They are also a very good source of Vitamin C and K and rich in phytonutrients, such as resveratrol, quercetin, anthocyanin and catechin. Evidence indicates that these powerful antioxidants prevent heart disease by inhibiting the build-up of plaque in coronary arteries, as well as inhibiting the growth of some cancers.

Grapes also contain Vitamin B6, vital for a healthy nervous system, while red grapes boast the same beneficial antioxidants as red wine – but without the alcohol. With a high water content of 80% water they help keep you hydrated throughout the day, and contain lots of fibre to help cleanse and detoxify the system

They also have a low GI certification from the Glycaemic Index Foundation meaning they’re a great source of long-lasting energy and a perfect pick-me-up when you’re peckish.

GRAPES Red Globe Thompson Seedless
Nutrient Value per 100 g Value per 100 g
Proximates
Energy, including dietary fibre 322 kJ 284 kJ
Moisture 80.7 g 79.6 g
Protein 0.9 g 0.6 g
Nitrogen 0.14 g 0.1 g
Fat 0.2 g 0.1 g
Ash 0.7 g 0.4 g
Dietary fibre 3.5 g 2.4 g
Fructose 9.2 g 7.8 g
Glucose 7.1 g 7.6 g
Total sugars 16.3 g 15.5 g
Available carbohydrate, without sugar alcohols 16.3 g 15.5 g
Available carbohydrate, with sugar alcohols 16.3 g 15.5 g
Organic Acids
Malic acid 1 g 0.3 g
Acetic acid 0 g 0.1 g
Quinic acid 0 g 0.5 g
Minerals
Calcium (Ca) 10 mg 14 mg
Copper (Cu) 0.1 mg 0.138 mg
Iron (Fe) 0.42 mg 0.31 mg
Magnesium (Mg) 8 mg 12 mg
Manganese (Mn) 0.08 mg 0.123 mg
Molybdenum (Mo) 1.3 ug 1.3 ug
Phosphorus (P) 19 mg 27 mg
Potassium (K) 270 mg 221 mg
Sodium (Na) 5 mg 4 mg
Zinc (Zn) 0.22 mg 0.09 mg
Vitamins
Thiamin (B1) 0.03 mg 0.01 mg
Riboflavin (B2) 0 mg 0.031 mg
Niacin (B3) 0 mg 0.41 mg
Niacin Equivalents 0.15 mg 0.5 mg
Pyridoxine (B6) 0.03 mg 0.03 mg
Biotin (B7) 0 ug 1.4 ug
Alpha carotene 0 ug 10 ug
Beta carotene 0 ug 31 ug
Cryptoxanthin 0 ug 144 ug
Beta carotene equivalents 0 ug 108 ug
Retinol equivalents 0 ug 18 ug
Vitamin C 0 mg 5 mg
Alpha tocopherol 0.5 mg 0.2 mg
Delta tocopherol 0.1 mg 0 mg
Vitamin E 0.5 mg 0.2 mg
Amino Acids
Tryptophan (mg/g N) 0 MN 49 MN
Tryptophan (mg) 0 mg 5 mg

 

Source:

NUTTAB 2010(Food Standards Australia New Zealand); The University of New South Wales; Professor Heather Greenfield and co-workers at the University of New South Wales; Tables of composition of Australian Aboriginal Foods (J Brand-Miller, KW James and PMA Maggiore).

Tips and Hints:

If low on energy, for a quick pick me up, eat a handful of grapes.