SCIENTIFIC NAME

Daucus carota

CLASSIFICATION

Vegetable

SEASON

January, February, March, April, May, June, July, August, September, October, November, December

About

Carrots are like an artist’s blank canvas, they can be turned into almost anything, sweet or savoury, raw or cooked, anything is possible with a carrot. The best thing about carrots is that they are exceptionally good for you raw, but cooking them also increases the amount of carotene that the body is able to absorb, so it is win, win, win every time you eat carrots.

The original wild carrots were thin, spindly and purple, quite different to the large orange carrots we know and love today.

Resurgence in heirloom varieties means that purple carrots are now available at many retailers.
Dutch carrots (sometimes called baby carrots) are normally sold in small bunches with the leaves still attached. They are very delicate to grow and harvest but never fail to impress in taste or aesthetics when served.
Carrots are grown all through the year, north of Perth in the Gingin region and in the south west of WA.

The original wild carrots were thin, spindly and purple, quite different to the large orange carrots we know and love today.

Resurgence in heirloom varieties means that purple carrots are now available at many retailers.
Dutch carrots (sometimes called baby carrots) are normally sold in small bunches with the leaves still attached. They are very delicate to grow and harvest but never fail to impress in taste or aesthetics when served.
Carrots are grown all through the year, north of Perth in the Gingin region and in the south west of WA.

The main thing to look for when selecting carrots is to make sure there are no splits in them. Fresh carrots will be brightly coloured and hard.

Store them in a plastic wrap or container in the coldest part of your fridge.

A lot of the goodness in carrots is kept just under the skin. Varieties these days have a super smooth, thin skin, so think about not peeling them, just give them a good wash, cut off the top and tail, and start cutting anyway you like.

The list of things you can do with carrots is endless: grated in sandwiches and wraps, juicing, coleslaws and salads, soups, stuffing, stirfrys, steamed, roasted, mashed, glazed and baking.

Carrots are famous for their β-carotene content, part of the Vitamin A group which appears to be used directly by the eye’s retina to maintain its function, ie your eyesight! Recent studies have also shown that carrot consumption may be linked to reducing the risk of cardiovascular disease.

CARROT
Nutrient Value per 100 g
Proximates
Energy, including dietary fibre 132 kJ
Moisture 88.6 g
Protein 0.8 g
Nitrogen 0.13 g
Fat 0.1 g
Ash 0.8 g
Dietary fibre 3.9 g
Fructose 1.1 g
Glucose 1.4 g
Surcose 2.5 g
Total sugars 5 g
Available carbohydrate, without sugar alcohols 5 g
Available carbohydrate, with sugar alcohols 5 g
Organic Acids
Malic acid 0.3 g
Minerals
Calcium (Ca) 30 mg
Copper (Cu) 0.049 mg
Fluoride 86.04 mg
Iodine (I) 0 mg
Iron (Fe) 0.28 mg
Magnesium (Mg) 12 mg
Manganese (Mn) 0.299 mg
Potassium (K) 36 mg
Selenium (Se) 0 ug
Sodium (Na) 40 mg
Zinc (Zn) 0.2 mg
Vitamins
Thiamin (B1) 0.079 mg
Riboflavin (B2) 0.04 mg
Niacin (B3) 0.69 mg
Niacin Equivalents 0.9 mg
Pantothenic acid (B5) 0.15 mg
Puridoxine (B6) 0.33 mg
Biotin (B7) 2.9 mg
Folate, natural 18 ug
Total folates 18 ug
Dietary folate equivalents 18 ug
Alpha carotene 3678 ug
Beta carotene 5996 ug
Cryphoxanthin 124 ug
Beta carotene equivalents 7896 ug
Retinol equivalents 1316 ug
Vitamin C 6 mg
Vitamin E 0.42 mg