SCIENTIFIC NAME

Brassica oleracea

CLASSIFICATION

Vegetable

SEASON

February, March, May, June, July, August, September, October, November, December

About

Cabbage is part of the brassica family (broccoli, cauliflowers, kale) and brings all the super good nutrients of this family.Unfortunately many people remember cabbage as an over cooked vegetable that we “had to eat” and it has been over-looked for its fantastic diversity as an ingredient. There are the tight red and green cabbages and the more loose savoy cabbage, and you can even find little mini-cabbages available from time to time.

While it’s impossible to imagine getting through a summer without a cabbage filled coleslaw, we are now starting to see some great recipes using cabbage leaves to hold stuffings and fillings, in soups and stir frys. Welcome back to our kitchens cabbage – we’ve missed you!

Cabbage has a very high water content and a light peppery taste, which is one of the reasons why it’s fantastic as a summer coleslaw as cut finely, you can keep it super cold – light, crunchy and refreshing.

It’s also well noted by the “juicers” of the world who frequently add it as an ingredient in their juicing machine to extract some of those cancer fighting properties and a little spice to balance out the taste.

Cabbages love the cold and are produced mostly around Perth and the South West of WA and are available all year around.

Varieties: Many people will be familiar with green and red cabbages with tight heads and savoy cabbage their more bubbly leaves and looser heads. Tuscan cabbage (cavolo nero) is also available which is a dark green colour with bubbly almost upright leaves.

Look for a tight, fresh head for your traditional red and green cabbages, the savoy cabbage leaves will be looser.

Cabbage should be kept as cold as possible, storing it between 0-2 degrees will keep it the longest. Whole cabbage will last for up to 8 days, but once cut, you need to use it within 2-3 days.

Don’t over-cook it! Over-cooking cabbage is what releases all the pungent odours that are often associated with cabbage. The healthiest and tastiest way to eat cabbage is to lightly stir-fry, or cut thinly and blanch or steam and serve with a little olive oil or butter and salt and pepper to season. Many people remove the inner core of cabbage, but it can be used as long as it’s cut finely.

Cabbage works really well in coleslaw because of it’s high water content, it can stay really cold and gives a light, refreshing, peppery crunch to coleslaw, and looks impressive when both red and green cabbages are used.
But for something really interesting, try making your own Sauerkraut (pickled cabbage)!

Don’t over-cook it! Over-cooking cabbage is what releases all the pungent odours that are often associated with cabbage. The healthiest and tastiest way to eat cabbage is to lightly stir-fry, or cut thinly and blanch or steam and serve with a little olive oil or butter and salt and pepper to season. Many people remove the inner core of cabbage, but it can be used as long as it’s cut finely.

Cabbage works really well in coleslaw because of it’s high water content, it can stay really cold and gives a light, refreshing, peppery crunch to coleslaw, and looks impressive when both red and green cabbages are used.
But for something really interesting, try making your own Sauerkraut (pickled cabbage)!

Cabbage is full of nutrients, but you’re preparation method will have a significant effect on the nutrients that are available to you. Lightly steamed cabbage releases more fibre which assists in removing cholesterol from your body, while raw cabbage appears to have more cancer fighting properties. So to get the best out of cabbage, use a mix of different varieties, both raw and lightly steamed or stir-fried throughout the week.

WHITE CABBAGE
Nutrient Value per 100 g
Proximates
Energy, including dietary fibre 109 kJ
Moisture 91 g
Protein 1.6 g
Nitrogen 0.25 g
Fat 0.1 g
Ash 0.6 g
Dietary fibre 2.7 g
Fructose 1.5 g
Glucose 1.9 g
Sucrose 0 g
Total sugars 3.4 g
Available carbohydrate, without sugar alcohols 3.4 g
Available carbohydrate, with sugar alcohols 3.4 g
Organic Acids
Malic acid 0.1 g
Citric acid 0.1 g
Minerals
Calcium (Ca) 35 mg
Copper (Cu) 0.021 mg
Fluoride (F) 27.84 mg
Iodine 0 ug
Iron (Fe) 0.51 mg
Magnesium (Mg) 15 mg
Manganese (Mn) 0.119 mg
Phosphorus (P) 40 mg
Potassium (K) 293 mg
Sodium (Na) 15 mg
Zinc (Zn) 0.26 mg
Vitamins
Thiamin (B1) 0.061 mg
Riboflavin (B2) 0.049 mg
Niacin (B3) 0.49 mg
Niacin Equivalents 0.66 mg
Pantothenic Acid (B5) 0.13 mg
Pyridoxine (B6) 0.11 mg
Biotin (B7) 2.1 ug
Folate, natural 16 ug
Total folates 16 ug
Dietary folate equivalents 16 ug
Alpha carotene 0 ug
Beta carotene 6 ug
Cryptoxanthin 0 ug
Beta carotene equivalents 6 ug
Retinol equivalents 1 ug
Vitamin C 55 mg
Alpha tocopherol 0 mg
Vitamin E 0 mg
Amino Acids
Tryptophan (mg/g N) 40 MN
Tryptophan (mg) 10 mg

Source:

NUTTAB 2010(Food Standards Australia New Zealand); The University of New South Wales; Professor Heather Greenfield and co-workers at the University of New South Wales; Tables of composition of Australian Aboriginal Foods (J Brand-Miller, KW James and PMA Maggiore).