SCIENTIFIC NAME

Phaseolus vulgaris

CLASSIFICATION

Vegetable

SEASON

January, February, March, April, June, July, August, November, December

About

Beans are high in fibre and antioxidants and have been used as food source for humans for thousands of years. While may be accustomed to the garden variety green bean, more varieties of some of the heritage and ‘old style’ cooking ingredients are now being re-introduced and maybe be available at your local Greengrocer.

There are two main types of green beans that are commonly available: the runner beans (or string beans) and the French (or stringless) beans. Some Greengrocers may also stock flat green beans (sometimes called Kentucky Blue), Butter Beans (which are yellow, broad beans use the large beans on the inside of the pod) or snake beans (long, thin, green beans) if you would like to try something a bit different.

From the north of WA in winter to the south of WA in summer, there is always growing region that is able to supply Perth with beans, however to keep up with demand, many beans also are supplied from other growing areas around Australia.

Look for brightly coloured to dark beans. Don’t use beans that have any signs of wrinkling from dehydration. Beans should be kept an air tight container in the fridge and will keep for between 4 to 6 days at this temperature.

Because of the inbuilt flavour of beans, they are quick and easy vegetable to serve. Trim the ends of the beans and either boil or steam quickly(don’t overcook) and serve either as it, or with a little olive oil butter drizzled over the top.

Beans are great to throw into stir-fry, casserole and soups. Try blanching the, cooling them and adding to salads to ass a different texture.

Because of the inbuilt flavour of beans, they are quick and easy vegetable to serve. Trim the ends of the beans and either boil or steam quickly(don’t overcook) and serve either as it, or with a little olive oil butter drizzled over the top.

Beans are great to throw into stir-fry, casserole and soups. Try blanching the, cooling them and adding to salads to ass a different texture.

Beans are a good source of Vitamin C, fibre and natural folate. Folate assists in cellular renewal (ie growth) and while we all know it’s important for pregnant women, it’s also really important for young growing bodies.

BEANS
Nutrient Value per 100 g
Proximates
Energy, including dietary fibre 122 kJ
Moisture 90.8 g
Protein 2.4 g
Nitrogen 0.39 g
Fat 0.2 g
Ash 0.6 g
Dietary fibre 3.1 g
Fructose 0.2 g
Glucose 0.9 g
Sucrose 0.2 g
Total sugars 1.3 g
Available carbohydrate, without sugar alcohols 2.7 g
Available carbohydrate, with sugar alcohols 2.7 g
Organic Acids
Malic acid 0.3 g
Minerals
Calcium (Ca) 49 mg
Copper (Cu) 0.075 mg
Iodine 20 ug
Iron (Fe) 1.07 mg
Magnesium (Mg) 30 mg
Manganese (Mn) 0.344 mg
Phosphorus (P) 42 mg
Potassium (K) 221 mg
Sodium (Na) 2 mg
Zinc (Zn) 0.54 mg
Vitamins
Thiamin (B1) 0.044 mg
Riboflavin (B2) 0.1 mg
Niacin (B3) 0.44 mg
Niacin Equivalents 1.02 mg
Pantothenic Acid (B5) 0.1 mg
Pyridoxine (B6) 0.11 mg
Biotin (B7) 3.9 ug
Folate, natural 21 ug
Total folates 21 ug
Dietary folate equivalents 21 ug
Alpha carotene 33 ug
Beta carotene 204 ug
cryptoxanthin 37 ug
Beta carotene equivalents 239 ug
Retinol equivalents 40 ug
Vitamin C 23 mg
Alpha tocopherol 0 mg
Vitamin E 0 mg
Amino Acids
Tryptophan (mg/g N) 56 MN
Tryptophan (mg) 34 mg

Source:

NUTTAB 2010(Food Standards Australia New Zealand); The University of New South Wales; Professor Heather Greenfield and co-workers at the University of New South Wales; Tables of composition of Australian Aboriginal Foods (J Brand-Miller, KW James and PMA Maggiore).