SCIENTIFIC NAME

Persea americana

CLASSIFICATION

Fruit

SEASON

January, February, March, April, May, June, July, August, November, December

About

Australians were fairly late to adopt this amazing fruit, but since tasting our first delecious, creamy Avocado, we haven’t been able to put them down! Our love for avocados has seen hundreds of growers all over Australia supply nearlythe whole year through, from the tropical far north Queensland in winter to the temperature sounth coast WA during summer.

Avocados stand alone in the produce world for their rich creamy texture and endless usage possibilities. WA supplies fruit through our spring and summer and then in winter supply comes from sunny north Queensland.

From time to time there may be insufficient volume in Australia, and Avocados will be sourced from New Zealand but with the continuous increase in Australian production, this is likely to become a rare event.

It’s easy to tell if this variety is ripe by their colour. If the avocado is green, it is probably 3-4 days away from being ripe, if it’s a light purple/green, it will need a day or two, if the avocado’s skin colour has turned dark purple, it is ready to eat now. The great thing about avocadoes is you can buy some to eat right now and some for later in the week.

Green avocados should be stored at room temperature to allow them to continue to ripen, once they are ripe or they have been cut, store them in the fridge.

Start with a ripe Avocado and cut it lengthwise around the seed. Rotate the halves to separate.

Remove the seed by sliding the tip of a spoon gently underneath and lifting out.

Simply scoop out the Avocado flesh with a spoon. Be sure to sprinkle all cut surfaces with lemon juice, lime juice or white vinegar, to prevent discolouration Avocados are a great side dish on their own with a little lemon juice, olive oil, salt and pepper to season and will instantly give depth and texture to the most simplest of salads.

Start with a ripe Avocado and cut it lengthwise around the seed. Rotate the halves to separate.

Remove the seed by sliding the tip of a spoon gently underneath and lifting out.

Simply scoop out the Avocado flesh with a spoon. Be sure to sprinkle all cut surfaces with lemon juice, lime juice or white vinegar, to prevent discolouration Avocados are a great side dish on their own with a little lemon juice, olive oil, salt and pepper to season and will instantly give depth and texture to the most simplest of salads.

Avocados are nutrient dense and a good source of folate, Vitamin K, Vitamin C and Vitamin E. Just like other fruits avocados are high in water (75%) but remain nutrient dense. They are rich in fibre and healthy fats while naturally low in sugar and sodium.

AVOCADO
Nutrient Value per 100 g
Proximates
Energy, including dietary fibre 862 kJ
Moisture 70.9 g
Protein 0.2 g
Nitrogen 0.33 g
Fat 21.2 g
Ash 1.5 g
Dietary fibre 2.5 g
Fructose 0.1 g
Glucose 0.3 g
Sucrose 0.1 g
Total sugars 0.6 g
Available carbohydrate, without sugar alcohols 1.6 g
Available carbohydrate, with sugar alcohols 1.6 g
Organic Acids
Malic acid 0.4 g
Citric acid 0.1 g
Minerals
Calcium (Ca) 12 mg
Copper (Cu) 0.27 mg
Fluoride (F) 121.25 mg
Magnesium (Mg) 27 mg
Magnesium (Mg) 27 mg
Manganese (Mn) 0.233 mg
Phosphorus (P) 48 mg
Potassium (K) 520 mg
Sodium (Na) 4 mg
Zinc (Zn) 0.57 mg
Vitamins
Thiamin (B1) 0.08 mg
Riboflavin (B2) 0.136 mg
Niacin (B3) 2.16 mg
Niacin Equivalents 2.49 mg
Folate, natural 59 ug
Total folates 59 ug
Dietary folate equivalents 59 ug
Alpha carotene 165 ug
Beta carotene 29 ug
Cryptoxanthin 103 ug
Beta carotene equivalents 163 ug
Vitamin E 1.95 mg
Retinol equivalents 27 ug
Vitamin C 13 mg

 

Fatty Acids
C8 0 %T
C10 0 %T
C12 0 %T
C14 0 %T
C15 0 %T
C16 25 %T
C17 0 %T
C18 0 %T
Total saturated fatty acids (%) 25 %T
C16:1 11 %T
C17:1 0 %T
C18:1 49 %T
Total monounsaturated fatty acids (%) 60 %T
C18:2w6 14 %T
C18:3w3 0 %T
Total polyunsaturated fatty acids (%) 14 %T
C8FD 0 g
C10FD 0 g
C12FD 0 g
C14FD 0 g
C15FD 0 g
C16FD 5.07 g
C17FD 0 g
C18FD 0 g
Total saturated fatty acids (g) 5.1 g
C16:1FD 2.23 g
C17:1FD 0 g
C18:1FD 9.94 g
Total monounsaturated fatty acids (g) 12.17 g
C18:2w6FD 2.84 g
C18:3w3FD 0 g
Total polyunsaturated fatty acids (g) 2.8 g
Cholesterol 0 mg

Source:

NUTTAB 2010(Food Standards Australia New Zealand); The University of New South Wales; Professor Heather Greenfield and co-workers at the University of New South Wales; Tables of composition of Australian Aboriginal Foods (J Brand-Miller, KW James and PMA Maggiore).